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Books for Python 3.7


Thats a good idea. Indeed- take an online course,  it is cheap, gets your
thru basics and you have an instructor to help if you r stuck.
Id vote for online course vs buying a book .

On Mon, Jul 15, 2019, 19:43 DL Neil <PythonList at danceswithmice.info> wrote:

> Wlfraed probably knows a thing-or-two about kicking-over ants'
> nests/wasps' nests...
>
> Talking about books is one thing. Judging them by asyncio coverage is
> quite another - and rather unfair. The use and methods of asyncio have
> changed frequently and markedly since '3.0'. Books take time to produce,
> sell, buy, and consume...
>
>
> Recommend OP takes a look at the LeanPub series: Python Apprentice;
> Journeyman; and Master. They also publish Mike Driscoll - few of which I
> have read personally [hangs head in embarrassment/shame], but I do
> follow his "Mouse Vs Python" web site...
>
>
> I much prefer to learn from a dead-tree presentation - and likely gain
> as much benefit from being able to 'look stuff up', thereafter. However,
> YMMV!
>
> Accordingly, the OP might like to broaden his analysis beyond books
> (paper or on-line) and take a look at MOOCs (on-line courses). Each
> platform seems to offer something on Python (some good, some tedious,
> some little more than puffery) [disclaimer: 'my' courses (non-Python)
> are hosted on edX].
>
> Just this morning I noted a veritable wave of free courses being
> released on the Swayam platform (Indian universities) including:  The
> Joy of Computing using Python
> (
> https://www.classcentral.com/course/swayam-the-joy-of-computing-using-python-14329).
>
>
>
> NB sadly I don't have time to attempt/review this myself, but would be
> intrigued to hear from you, should you...
>
>
> Last comment (to OP): you should be aware of the Python version
> 'covered'. Am not convinced that v3.7 is that important - to a beginner.
> Thus, maybe accept v3.5+, and make a practice of reviewing the Python
> docs - especially the Release Notes if you think version differences are
> important/worthy of particular concern.
>
>
> On 16/07/19 9:24 AM, Andrew Z wrote:
> > Gys - hats off.
> >
> > Basically what Dennis is saying- you dont need a book "about python ".
> > Tutorials and general search online will get you further and faster than
> > any book.
> >
> > Blah-blah about myself:
> > my bookshelf has 2 technical books, just because i got them to prepare
> for
> > certifications.
> > For my trading app, i had to figure  out how to work with asyncio module,
> > at the time -2017 , there were no semi- decent explanation for it, let
> > alone books. By 2018 it became "the thing" with a ton of books.
> > Blah-blah= off
> >
> > Good luck.
> >
> > P.s. and if you want to implement your idea really fast and easy - look
> at
> > the go (golang.org). In my humble opinion- it is super easy and
> excellent
> > all around. Doing their golangtour is all you need to write a working
> app.
> > P.p.s. i just started a holy war .. damn.
> >
> > On Mon, Jul 15, 2019, 17:03 Dennis Lee Bieber <wlfraed at ix.netcom.com>
> wrote:
> >
> >> On Mon, 15 Jul 2019 22:17:34 +0200, Gys <invalid at invalid.com> declaimed
> >> the
> >> following:
> >>
> >>> I also would like to have a good book, but have not yet decided which
> >>> one. There is a 50$ book on learning Python; the language reference (?)
> >>> There is a 50$ book for learning PyQt5 programming of a GUI. There is a
> >>> 50$ book on using Python in Pandas for analysing tabular data.
> >>>
> >>
> >>          For the language and "batteries" -- every distribution should
> >> provide
> >> the language reference, and the standard library reference. If one has
> a)
> >> experience with other languages, the LRM should be sufficient for
> learning
> >> the syntax; b) skill at interpreting technical documents, one should
> become
> >> familiar with the contents of the SL reference (this does not mean
> >> memorizing all of it -- critical would be the chapters on data types
> [which
> >> explains what one can do with lists, dictionaries, tuples...] and then
> get
> >> an idea of the contents of other chapters, so one can look up specifics
> for
> >> tasks.
> >>
> >>          After that, one ends up with print books that tend to focus on
> >> narrow
> >> application domains: XML, WxPython, SQLAlchemy, MatPlotLib, Win32 (just
> >> from scanning my bookshelf).
> >>
> >>          If one lacks both A and B, one ends up with various editions of
> >> "Learning Python", "Programming Python", and "Fluent Python" (among many
> >> others).
> >>
> >>
> >> --
> >>          Wulfraed                 Dennis Lee Bieber         AF6VN
> >>          wlfraed at ix.netcom.com
> >> http://wlfraed.microdiversity.freeddns.org/
> >>
> >> --
> >> https://mail.python.org/mailman/listinfo/python-list
> >>
>
> --
> Regards =dn
> --
> https://mail.python.org/mailman/listinfo/python-list
>