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[Python-Dev] Failing tests [Was: Re: Python 3.7.0 is now available! (and so is 3.6.6)]


On Jul 1, 2018, at 17:48, Mat?j Cepl <mcepl at cepl.eu> wrote:
> On 2018-06-28, 00:58 GMT, Ned Deily wrote:
>> On behalf of the Python development community and the Python 3.7 release
>> team, we are pleased to announce the availability of Python 3.7.0.
> 
> I am working on updating openSUSE packages to python 3.7, but 
> I have hit quite large number of failing tests (the testsuite 
> obviously passed with 3.6), see
> https://build.opensuse.org/package/show/home:mcepl:work/python3 
> (click on the red "failed" label to get logs). I fell into 
> a bout of depression, only to discover that we are not alone in 
> this problem ... Debian doesn't seem to do much better 
> https://is.gd/HKBU4j. Surprisingly, Fedora seems to pass the 
> testsuite https://is.gd/E0KA53; interesting, I will have to 
> investigate which of their many patches did the trick.
> 
> Anybody has any idea, what's going on, please? Did anybody on 
> the python.org side run test suites on Linux?

Without doing a detailed analysis of how your build system is set up, I do note you have "--enable-shared" set on ./configure which is often the source of problems.  Make sure that you are building from a clean build directory and that you are not building on a system that already has an installed Python 3.7 pre-release at the same prefix location.

Of course we run test suites on Linux :)  Each time a change is merged our CI tests are run on Linux, we have a fleet of buildbots that test every commit on various flavors of Linux, and prior to release the release manager does a smoke test of building and testing on at least one Linux variant.  That's not to say there couldn't be multiple configurations with undetected problems but the number of problems here points to something much more basic.

If necessary, please open an issue on bugs.python.org so we can get this resolved quickly.  Thanks!

--
  Ned Deily
  nad at python.org -- []