Rougemont Tree 2



Bernard de Chalon married Marie de Rougemont daughter of Thibaut 6
Seigneur de Rougemont. William of Orange more then likely offered my
Rosamond ancestor Catholic lands in Ireland because we are kin. The
House of Orange descends through the female line as does the
Rougemont/Habsburg liniage. Is this a Jewish tradition?

Jon Presco

VIII (XIII) (XXI) Jean IV prince d' Orange (etc), died in 1502.
marry in 1467: Jeanne girl of Charles I duke of Bourbon, died in
1493. cf: Second dynasty of Bourbon .
in 1494: Philiberte countess of Charny girl of Antoine I count de
Brienne, died in 1539.
cf: Dynasty of Luxembourg (county) .
2 children of the second marriage:
- Claude born in 1498, died in 1521.
marry in 1515: Henri III count de Nassau-Dillenbourg, died in 1538.
cf: Dynasty of Nassau .
- Philibert born in 1502, prince d' Orange (etc) and prince de
Melphe and duke of Gravina and count of
Thunder and count de Charny and count de Penthièvre and Viscount of
Besancon and lord of Rougemont
and lord of Nozeroy and lord of Orgelet and lord of Montfaucon,
killed in 1530.


William of Orange
William of Orange (French: Guillaume , Dutch: Willem ) is the name
of several historical people. In thecontext of English history, it
refers most often to WilliamIII of England ; in the context of Dutch
history, William theSilent is most often meant.
These men could be meant by William of Orange:
? Saint William of Gellone (755-c.812), legendary courtier of
Charlemagne who defeated the Saracens at Orange, is often
calledWilliam of Orange.
? William of Orange was also a bishop accompanying the First
Crusade .After the death of Adhemar of Le Puy , he was recognized as
leaderof the clergy, until he himself died six months later in
December of 1098 .
The following princes of Orange were also known as William ofOrange:
? William I (of Baux) (c.1155-1218)
? William II (of Baux) (c.1200-1239)
? William III (of Baux) (c.1220-1256)
? William IV (of Baux) (c.1240-1281)
? William VIII (of Chalon) (c.1415-1475)
After the counts of Nassau inherited the principality, the following
princes of Orange-Nassau (and stadtholders in theNetherlands) were
also known as William of Orange:
? William I of Orange-Nassau , (1533-1584),also known as
William the Silent
? William II of Orange-Nassau
? William III of Orange-Nassau , also kingof England
? William IV of Orange-Nassau
? William V of Orange-Nassau
The following kings of the Netherlands from the House of Orange-
Nassau may also sometimes be known as William of Orange:
? William I of the Netherlands .
? William II of the Netherlands
? William III of theNetherlands .
This is a disambiguation page ? a navigational aid which lists other
pages that might otherwise sharethe same title. If an article link
referred you here, you might want to go back and fix it to point
directly to the intendedpage.

http://www.villa-kerylos.com/les_baux/

<>
"William_of_Orange "
Categories : Disambiguation
________________________________________

________________________________________

http://www.geerts.com/holland/orange-house.htm

http://gilles.maillet.free.fr/histoire/famille_bourgogne/sire_arlay.h
tm

http://genealogy.euweb.cz/ivrea/ivrea3.html

http://genealogy.euweb.cz/french/neufchtl1.html


As early as 843, Charlemagne's descendants shared his Western Empire
in three parts: the Eastern Frank Kingdom (Louis the Germanic), the
Western Frank Kingdom (Charles the Bold) and, in the centre, the
Lotharingia (Lothair) which soon arose the covetousness of its two
neighbours. The Lotharingia included Burgundy and the Franche-
Comté. Then two Burgundies appeared: that of the Dukes, in the West
which was entrusted to the brother of the King of France and that of
the Palatine Counts which was a dependency of the German Empire
(Frederic Barbarossa).
ocal noblemen managed to establish family ties between the two
Burgundies. Thus, from the beginning of the XIIIth Century, the
Chalon-Arlay were the first noblemen of the South of Franche-Comté.
Later on, their power was strengthened due to the exploitation of
the salt in Salins. At the beginning of the XVth Century, Jean III
of Chalon-Arlay married the heiress of the Orange Principality:
since then, the eldest of the men of this line of descents bore the
title of "Prince of Orange".


But in 1530, the last of these descendants, Philibert of Chalon-
Arlay, Prince of Orange, Viceroy of Naples was killed during the
war. In the absence of any direct heirs, his properties and his
title of Prince of Orange were attributed to William the Silent,
first Governor of Holland. He is the ancestor of Her Majesty, the
Queen of Holland who is still Princess of Orange and "Baron from
Arlay".

onetheless, lawsuits which lasted for two centuries, from 1530 to
1730, were necessary to settle the fabulous heritage of Philibert of
Chalon, a part of which Louis the XVth, King of France, endowed to
the Marshall of Isenghien, then to his niece, the Countess of
Lauraguais. Because of the jealousy arisen, she was arrested in
1794, tried, condemned and guillotined. All the furniture of the
castle was taken away. It is only in 1825 that her grandson, the
Prince Pierre of Arenberg, recovered the properties of his
grandmother. To-day, his descendants are in charge of the property.

http://www.arlay.com/

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~jamesdow/s000/f375096.htm


Tumultuous history of the castle of the Beams
The lords of the Beams were famous at the Average Age, "Race of
eaglets, never vassal", known as Mistral. Indeed, at that time, they
count among most powerful feudal South. Applicant to go down from
the one of the three Magi, they have like emblème evening star and
currency: "Randomly, Balthazar". These rebellious knights lead the
destiny of the Beams and their 79 strongholds during five centuries.
Proud and unsubdued lords, they run up against their powerful
neighbors of Toulouse and Provence, like with the progressive
surrounding of the Kingdom of France.

>From this disturbed period emergent some emblematic figures, of
which Raymond of the Beams, who carries out the baussenques wars
(1145-1162), disputing the county of Provence to the Count de
Barcelone; Raymond de Turenne, called the "plague of Provence",
which throws its prisoners top of the Castle and finally Alix of the
Beams, last appears of this turbulent line and single heiress of the
baussenques grounds.

In spite of these ceaseless conflicts which devastate Provence, the
cultural life is particularly rich with the Beams: famous courses of
love develop, gathering poets and ménestrels come to sing the
Courtly love for the young ladies of the Beams.

At the beginning of XVe century, the seigniory, incorporated in
Provence, is nothing any more but one simple baronnie. King Rene
gives it to his Jeanne wife of Laval. Joined together with the Crown
of France with Provence, the baronnie revolts in 1483 against Louis
XI, who makes dismantle the fortress and makes it place under the
control of the captains governors. Most famous among them, Anne de
Montmorency, undertakes significant restorations and the city knows
a period ostentation again. The Beams become a hearth of
Protestantism under the Manville family which manages the baronnie
for the crown.

But the fights of influence and the conflicts family involve little
by little the decline of the city. In 1632, Richelieu, tired of this
turbulent and disobedient stronghold, makes demolish the castle and
the ramparts.

The Beams are finally set up in marquisat for Grimaldi, princes de
Monaco. In 1791, they are attached to France against pecuniary
compensation.

Impoverished by the loss of its political and military role, the
village of the Beams does not see its population decreasing, the
deserted Citadel is not any more but one "dead city". Only the large
provençaux poets, like Frederic Mistral or Alphonse Daudet, still
defend these attractive ruins.

In 1821, the Berthier geologist discovers in the surroundings red
rock which makes it possible to produce Aluminium. He baptizes
it "bauxite".

The opening, in 1945, of famous restoring "Oustau de Beaumanière"
makes it possible to attract with the Beams heads of States, artists
and characters famous. Their arrival marks the rediscovery of the
Beams by a broad public sensitive to the single character of the
places. Since 1992, the Castle of the Beams is the framework of an
exceptional programme of excavations and development, which makes
the site even gravitational.

http://www.casteland.com/indexuk.htm


1584: Willem of Orange assassinate in Delft
Although it was Philip II who set a price on the head of William of
Orange, and by that gave the order to have him killed, originally
there was a strong bond between the two nobles. Charles V was a
father figure not only to his own son Philip but to William as well.
After a large inheritance from his cousin René de Chalon, William of
Orange took up a prominent position in the Dutch nobility. The
oldest son of Willem de Rijke, of the house of Nassau, was
henceforth allowed to be called the prince of Orange. His marriage
to Anna van Buren made him very wealthy. In 1559 Philip named Orange
as stadholder of the provinces Holland and West-Friesland, Zeeland
and Utrecht. During his reign Philip wanted to reform the governing
of the country at the cost of the power of the Dutch nobility. The
nobility rebelled under the leadership of William and protested at
the same time against the severe religious persecution. William of
Orange was sympathetic towards Protestantism but also had Catholic
friends. For him, religious freedom and tolerance were important
ideals.
After `The breaking of the Images', whereby radical
Protestants `cleansed' churches of holy images, Philip sent the Duke
of Alva to the Netherlands to restore his authority and to punish
the insurgents. With this history took a dramatic turn. The conflict
escalated and lead to war. Orange fled to the German family
castle,`de Dillenburg,' and raised an army to win back his lost
rights and possessions. He had no luck in battle. But when a
Protestant army was successful in obtaining a large portion of the
province of Holland, Orange moved to Delft to lead the Dutch Revolt.
He took up residence in the St. Agatha cloister, which from that
point on would be called the Prinsenhof.
http://nt-web1.concepts.nl/webEN/content.jsp?objectid=1369
--- In Secessionist-Movement@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx, "Jon Presco"
<braskewitz@xxxx> wrote:
>
> http://tinyurl.com/6otak
>
>
> Jon

FOUNDATIONS
The Dominican fraternity of Besancon celebrated on February 11, 1995
its fiftieth anniversary. It testifies today by its presence to
vitality about Saint-Dominique in our area. A history whose origin
goes up with the foundation of the convent of Besancon by the Jordan
of Saxony in 1224.
" We consider it necessary to transmit to the memory those to come
that our worthy brothers, the Senior and all the Chapter of our
church-mother of Midsummer's Day Évangéliste of Besancon, and...
inspired by the Holy Spirit, called in our city the révérents
brothers canons of the Order of the Preachers... "

By these words, and at the request of the Archbishop of Besancon,
Gerard de Rougemont, the metropolitan Chapter of Midsummer's Day,
yields to the Order the Dominican ones, in 1224, a ground which
extends from theSaint-Paul abbey to the Rivotte door.
The Jordan of Saxony can thus found a convent . It also profits from
the right to have a cemetery.
The PEDIGREE of
Humbert II de ROUGEMONT
Born: ? Died: by 1227
Poss. HM George I's 17-Great Grandfather. HRH Charles's 23-
Great Grandfather. Louis XVII's 20-Great Grandfather. HM
Juan Carlos' 23-Great Grandfather.
________________________________________
Wife/Partner: Sibille de BESANCON
Child: Hugues de ROUGEMONT
________________________________________
________ ________ _______ _______
_______ ____ ____ ___
/ -- Thiebaut I de ROUGEMONT

/ -- Thiebaut II de ROUGEMONT (? - 1173+)

/ \ -- Poncette de TRAVES (? - 1156+)

- Humbert II de ROUGEMONT
\

\ -- Alais





________________________________________
His (poss.) 2-Great Grandchild: Philippe de VIENNE
His (poss.) 5-Great Grandchildren: Philippe de
JONVELLE ; Gilette de VIENNE ; Hugues de VIENNE ;
Marguerite de VIENNE

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~jamesdow/s032/f034986.htm
http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~jamesdow/s032/f034986.htm
http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~jamesdow/s072/f272840.htm

The PEDIGREE of
Sibille de BESANCON

Poss. HM George I's 17-Great Grandmother. HRH Charles's 23-
Great Grandmother. Louis XVII's 20-Great Grandmother. HM
Juan Carlos' 23-Great Grandmother.
________________________________________
Husband/Partner: Humbert II de ROUGEMONT
Child: Hugues de ROUGEMONT
________________________________________
________ ________ _______ _______
_______ ____ ____ ___
/ -- Odon de BESANCON

/

- Sibille de BESANCON
\

\ -- Julienne





________________________________________
Her (poss.) 2-Great Grandchild: Philippe de VIENNE
Her (poss.) 5-Great Grandchildren: Philippe de
JONVELLE ; Gilette de VIENNE ; Hugues de VIENNE ;
Marguerite de VIENNE

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~jamesdow/s033/f034986.htm
http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~jamesdow/s016/f017493.htm

|-------de ROUGEMONT, "Thibaud V, Sire"
|------de ROUGEMONT, Guillaume
| |-------N., Jeanne
de ROUGEMONT, "Humbert V, Sire"
| |-------de RAY, Gautier
|------de RAY, Marguerite
|-------de BLAMONT, Cunégonde
Sexe: Masculin
Décès : 5 avril 1412
Occupation : Chevalier. Sire d'Usies. Fait hommage, le 21 avril 1389
comme ...
... tuteur des enfants de Guillaume son fils, à Jean de Châlon.
Teste le 9 décembre 1406.
Famille de ROUGEMONT - de NEUCHÂTEL
|------de NEUCHÂTEL, "Thibaud VI"
de NEUCHÂTEL, Alix
|------de BOURGOGNE, Marguerite
Sexe: Féminin
Décès : 25 septembre 1414
NEUCHÂTEL (Suisse) porte, selon Lurion: "D'or au pal de gueules
chargé de trois chevrons d'argent."
de ROUGEMONT, Jeanne


Sex: Masculine
Death: April 5, 1412
Occupation: Knight. Lord d' Usies. Fact homage, April 21, 1389
like...
... tutor of the children of Guillaume his son, in Jean de Châlon.
Test on December 9, 1406.
| ROUGEMONT, "Humbert IV, Lord" | ROUGEMONT, "Thibaud V, Lord"
|| DURNES, Agnes
ROUGEMONT, Guillaume
| N, Jeanne
Sex: Masculine
Death: 1352
Occupation: Knight. Lord of the place and Usies.

The Carmelite Order
Catholic Encyclopedia on CD-ROM
Contains 11,632 articles. Browse off-line, ad-free, printer-friendly.
Get it here for only $29.95

One of the mendicant orders.
Origin
The date of the foundation of the Order of Our Lady of Mount Carmel
has been under discussion from the fourteenth century to the present
day, the order claiming for its founders the prophets Elias and
Eliseus, whereas modern historians, beginning with Baronius, deny
its existence previous to the second half of the twelfth century. As
early as the times of the Prophet Samuel there existed in the Holy
Land a body of men called Sons of the Prophets, who in many respects
resembled religious institutes of later times. They led a kind of
community life, and, though not belonging to the Tribe of Levi,
dedicated themselves to the service of God; above all they owed
obedience to certain superiors, the most famous of whom were Elias
and his successor Eliseus, both connected with Carmel, the former by
his encounter with the prophets of Baal, the latter by prolonged
residence on the holy mountain. With the downfall of the Kingdom of
Israel the Sons of the Prophets disappear from history. In the third
or fourth century of the Christian Era Carmel was a place of
pilgrimage, as is proved by numerous Greek inscriptions on the walls
of the School of the Prophets: "Remember Julianus, remember
Germanicus", etc. Several of the Fathers, notably John Chrystostom,
Basil, Gregory Nazianzen, and Jerome, represent Elias and Eliseus as
the models of religious perfection and the patrons of hermits and
monks. These undeniable facts have opened the way to certain
conjectures. As St. John the Baptist spent nearly the whole of his
life in the desert, where he gathered around him a number of
disciples, and as Christ said he was endowed with the spirit and
virtue of Elias, some authors think that he revived the institute of
the Sons of the Prophets.
The glowing descriptions given by Pliny, Flavius Josephus, and
Philo, of the manner of life of the Essenes and Therapeutes
convinced others that these sects belonged to the same corporation;
unfortunately their orthodoxy is open to serious doubts. Tacitus
mentions a sanctuary on Carmel, consisting "neither of a temple, nor
an idol, but merely an altar for Divine worship"; whatever its
origin may have been, it certainly was at the time of Vespasian in
the hands of a pagan priest, Basilides. Pythagoras (500 B.C.) is
represented by Jamblichus (A.D. 300) as having spent some time in
silent prayer in a similar sanctuary on Carmel, a testimony of
greater force for the time of Jambilichus himself than for that of
Pythagoras. Nicephorus Callistus (A.D. 1300) relates that the
Empress Helena built a church in honour of St. Elias on the slopes
of a certain mountain. This evidence is, however, inadmissible,
inasmuch as Eusebius is witness to the fact that she built only two
churches in the Holy Land, at Bethlehem and at Jerusalem, not
twenty, as Nicephorus says; moreover the words of this author show
clearly that he had in view the Greek monastery of Mar Elias,
overhanging the Jordan valley, and not Carmel as some authors think;
Mar Elias, however, belongs to the sixth century. These and other
misunderstood quotations have enfeebled rather than strengthened the
tradition of the order, which holds that from the days of the great
Prophets there has been, if not an uninterrupted, at least a moral
succession of hermits on Carmel, first under the Old Dispensation,
afterwards in the full light of Christianity, until at the time of
the Crusades these hermits became organized after the fashion of the
Western orders. This tradition is officially laid down in the
constitutions of the order, is mentioned in many papal Bulls, as
well as in the Liturgy of the Church, and is still held by many
members of the order.
Etienne III, comte de Bourgogne1
b. circa 1171?, #23944
Pedigree
Count of Auxonne.1 Seigneur de Rochefort.1 Count of Burgundy.1
Also called Graf von Burgund-Macon Stefan III von Burgund.2 Etienne
III, comte de Bourgogne was born circa 1171?. He was the son of
Etienne II, comte de Bourgogne and Judith von Ober-Lothringen.1 He
married Beatrix, comtesse de Chalon, daughter of Guillaume II, comte
de Chalon and Beatrix de Suabe, in 1188; His 1st.3 He died on 16
March 1241.4

Children of Etienne III, comte de Bourgogne and Beatrix,
comtesse de Chalon:
Jean I "le Sage", comte de Bourgogne+ b. 1190, d. 29 Sep 1267
Clémence de Bourgogne b. c 1192?
1. [S1345] Anselme de Sainte-Marie (augustin déchaussé),
Histoire généalogique et chronologique de la maison royale de
France, des pairs, grands officiers de la couronne et de la maison
du roy et des anciens barons du royaume. (Reprod. de l'éd. de
Paris : chez Estienne Loyson, 1674: Num. BNF de l'éd. de Paris :
Biblioth&#269;que nationale de France, 1987. 1 microfilmReprod. de l'éd.
de Paris : Compagnie des libraires associez, 1730, 1730), VIII:413.
Hereinafter cited as Pere Anselme's Histoire, 3rd Ed..
2. [S970] Mittelalterliche Genealogie im Deutschen Reich bis
zum Ende der Staufer, online http://www.genealogie-mittelalter.de/,
Haus Chatenois (Elsaß). Hereinafter cited as MGDR.
3. [S1345] Anselme de Sainte-Marie (augustin déchaussé), Pere
Anselme's Histoire, 3rd Ed., VIII:62.
4. [S467] Généalogie des rois de France, online
http://jeanjacques.villemag.free.fr/, comte de Bourgogne.
Hereinafter cited as GdRdF.

Etienne II, comte de Bourgogne1
b. circa 1121?, #25897
Pedigree
Seigneur de Traves.1 Count of Burgundy.1 Etienne II, comte de
Bourgogne was born circa 1121?. He was the son of Guillaume IV,
comte de Bourgogne and Adelais, dame de Traves.1 He married Judith
von Ober-Lothringen, daughter of Matthäus I, Herzog von Ober-
Lothringen and Bertha von Schwaben, in 1170.2

Child of Etienne II, comte de Bourgogne and Judith von Ober-
Lothringen:
Etienne III, comte de Bourgogne+ b. c 1171?
1. [S1345] Anselme de Sainte-Marie (augustin déchaussé),
Histoire généalogique et chronologique de la maison royale de
France, des pairs, grands officiers de la couronne et de la maison
du roy et des anciens barons du royaume. (Reprod. de l'éd. de
Paris : chez Estienne Loyson, 1674: Num. BNF de l'éd. de Paris :
Bibliothèque nationale de France, 1987. 1 microfilmReprod. de l'éd.
de Paris : Compagnie des libraires associez, 1730, 1730), VIII:412.
Hereinafter cited as Pere Anselme's Histoire, 3rd Ed..
2. [S1345] Anselme de Sainte-Marie (augustin déchaussé), Pere
Anselme's Histoire, 3rd Ed., VIII:413.

Guillaume IV, comte de Bourgogne1
b. circa 1091?, d. 27 September 1155, #5085
Pedigree
Guillaume IV, comte de Bourgogne was born circa 1091?. He was
the son of Etienne I "Tête hardie", comte Palatin de Bourgogne and
Beatrix de Lorraine. He married Adelais, dame de Traves, daughter of
Thibaud, seigneur de Traves and Alix (?), in 1120.2 He joined the
2nd Crusade between 1144 and 1148. He died on 27 September 1155.
Children of Guillaume IV, comte de Bourgogne and Adelais, dame
de Traves:
Etienne II, comte de Bourgogne+ b. c 1121?
Gérard I de Bourgogne, comte de Vienne & de Mâcon+ b. c 1122?,
d. 15 Sep 1184
1. [S1345] Anselme de Sainte-Marie (augustin déchaussé),
Histoire généalogique et chronologique de la maison royale de
France, des pairs, grands officiers de la couronne et de la maison
du roy et des anciens barons du royaume. (Reprod. de l'éd. de
Paris : chez Estienne Loyson, 1674: Num. BNF de l'éd. de Paris :
Bibliothèque nationale de France, 1987. 1 microfilmReprod. de l'éd.
de Paris : Compagnie des libraires associez, 1730, 1730), VIII:412.
Hereinafter cited as Pere Anselme's Histoire, 3rd Ed..
2. [S467] Généalogie des rois de France, online
http://jeanjacques.villemag.free.fr/, Comte de Bourgogne, 1120.
Hereinafter cited as GdRdF.
Guillaume I "Tête hardie", comte de Bourgogne & de Vienne1
b. circa 1024, d. 12 November 1087, #5235
Pedigree
Appears on charts:
Descendant Chart for Carolus I Magnus, empereur auguste
Guillaume I "Tête hardie", comte de Bourgogne & de Vienne also
went by the name of William I "the Great" of Burgundy. Also called
Graf von Burgund Wilhelm I von Burgund German.2 Also called comte de
palatin Bourgogne Guillaume II "le Grand" de Bourgogne.3 He was born
circa 1024. 1040? He was the son of Renaud I, comte de Bourgogne and
Alix de Normandie. He married Etiennette de Barcelona in 1043.4
Count of Burgundy between 1057 and 1087. He died on 12 November
1087.5
Children of Guillaume I "Tête hardie", comte de Bourgogne & de
Vienne and Etiennette de Barcelona:
Ermesende de Bourgogne+
Pope Callistus II of the Roman Catholics b. c 1050, d. 13 Dec
1124
Etienne I "Tête hardie", comte Palatin de Bourgogne+ b. c 1060,
d. 27 May 1102
Ermentrude de Bourgogne+ b. c 1060, d. a 8 Mar 1105
Mathilde de Bourgogne+ b. c 1065
Raymond, comte de Bourgogne+ b. 1065, d. bt 13 Sep 1107 - 20 Sep
1107
Renaud II, comte de Bourgogne, de Vienne, & de Mâcon+ b. s 1066
Gisèla de Bourgogne+ b. c 1070, d. a 1133
Clémence de Bourgogne+ b. b 1087
1. [S1345] Anselme de Sainte-Marie (augustin déchaussé),
Histoire généalogique et chronologique de la maison royale de
France, des pairs, grands officiers de la couronne et de la maison
du roy et des anciens barons du royaume. (Reprod. de l'éd. de
Paris : chez Estienne Loyson, 1674: Num. BNF de l'éd. de Paris :
Bibliothèque nationale de France, 1987. 1 microfilmReprod. de l'éd.
de Paris : Compagnie des libraires associez, 1730, 1730), VIII:411.
Hereinafter cited as Pere Anselme's Histoire, 3rd Ed..
2. [S970] Mittelalterliche Genealogie im Deutschen Reich bis
zum Ende der Staufer, online http://www.genealogie-mittelalter.de/,
der Balduine. Hereinafter cited as MGDR.
3. [S1280] Patrick van Kerrebrouck, Les Capetiens (Villeneuve
d'Ascq: Editions Christian, 2000), pg. 561. Hereinafter cited as
Capetiens 987-1328.
4. [S1345] Anselme de Sainte-Marie (augustin déchaussé), Pere
Anselme's Histoire, 3rd Ed., VIII:412.
5. [S274] INRIA - Domaine de Voluceau - Rocquencourt, online
ftp://ftp.inria.fr/INRIA/Projects/cristal/Daniel.de_Rauglaudre/GED/,
Research Engineer Daniel de Rauglaudre (Le Chesnay Cedex, France),
downloaded 04 NOV 1999.

Etiennette de Barcelona1
b. circa 1030, d. between 1088 and 1092, #5236
Etiennette de Barcelona was per new research, probably not the
daughter of Adalbert of Longwy, but having instead a kinship (but
not too close) to the Counts of Barcelona.2 Also called Étiennette
de Longwy.3 Also called Stephanie. She was born circa 1030.4 She
married Guillaume I "Tête hardie", comte de Bourgogne & de Vienne,
son of Renaud I, comte de Bourgogne and Alix de Normandie, in 1043.1
She died between 1088 and 1092.

Children of Etiennette de Barcelona and Guillaume I "Tête
hardie", comte de Bourgogne & de Vienne:
Ermesende de Bourgogne+
Pope Callistus II of the Roman Catholics b. c 1050, d. 13 Dec
1124
Etienne I "Tête hardie", comte Palatin de Bourgogne+ b. c 1060,
d. 27 May 1102
Ermentrude de Bourgogne+ b. c 1060, d. a 8 Mar 1105
Mathilde de Bourgogne+ b. c 1065
Raymond, comte de Bourgogne+ b. 1065, d. bt 13 Sep 1107 - 20 Sep
1107
Renaud II, comte de Bourgogne, de Vienne, & de Mâcon+ b. s 1066
Gisèla de Bourgogne+ b. c 1070, d. a 1133
Clémence de Bourgogne+ b. b 1087
1. [S1345] Anselme de Sainte-Marie (augustin déchaussé),
Histoire généalogique et chronologique de la maison royale de
France, des pairs, grands officiers de la couronne et de la maison
du roy et des anciens barons du royaume. (Reprod. de l'éd. de
Paris : chez Estienne Loyson, 1674: Num. BNF de l'éd. de Paris :
Bibliothèque nationale de France, 1987. 1 microfilmReprod. de l'éd.
de Paris : Compagnie des libraires associez, 1730, 1730), VIII:412.
Hereinafter cited as Pere Anselme's Histoire, 3rd Ed..
2. [S901] Todd A. Farmerie (e-mail address), Etiennette of
Longwy - NOT!!!!
In "Etiennette of Longwy - NOT!!!!", newsgroup message to
soc.genealogy.medieval, 2001-04-25 23:30:18 PST. Hereinafter cited
as Etiennette of Longwy - NOT!!!!
.
3. [S1280] Patrick van Kerrebrouck, Les Capetiens (Villeneuve
d'Ascq: Editions Christian, 2000), pg. 561. Hereinafter cited as
Capetiens 987-1328.
4. [S274] INRIA - Domaine de Voluceau - Rocquencourt, online
ftp://ftp.inria.fr/INRIA/Projects/cristal/Daniel.de_Rauglaudre/GED/,
Research Engineer Daniel de Rauglaudre (Le Chesnay Cedex, France),
downloaded 04 NOV 1999.

Otto-Wilhelm, Graf von Macon und Burgund
b. between 958 and 959, d. 21 September 1026, #5237
Pedigree
Appears on charts:
Descendant Chart for Carolus I Magnus, empereur auguste
Also called Otto-William. Also called comte de Bourgogne Othon
Guillaume de Bourgogne.1 Otto-Wilhelm, Graf von Macon und Burgund
was born between 958 and 959.2 He was the son of Adalbert II, Graf
von Aosta, Markgraf von Ivrea, König von Italien and Gerberga von
Macon.3 Did he succeed his wife's first husband to the countship of
Macon? He married Ermentrude de Roucy, daughter of comte de Reims
Renaud de Roucy and Albrade de Lorraine, in 982; His 1st. Her 2nd.4
Count of Burgundy between 995 and 1026. Did he succeed his step-
father, Odo Heinric, Duke Henry, son of Hugh le Grant, to rule
Burgundy?5 He married Adelaide d'Anjou before 1016; His 2nd. He died
on 21 September 1026.6 Otto-Wilhelm, Graf von Macon und Burgund was
buried in Dijon, France.
Children of Otto-Wilhelm, Graf von Macon und Burgund and
Ermentrude de Roucy:
Mathilda de Bourgogne+ b. bt 975 - 980, d. 13 Nov 1005
Gerberge de Bourgogne+ b. c 985, d. bt 1019 - 1024
Renaud I, comte de Bourgogne+ b. c 990, d. 4 Sep 1057
Agnes de Bourgogne+ b. c 995, d. 9 Nov 1068
1. [S204] Roderick W. Stuart, Royalty for Commoners: The
Complete Lineage of John of Gaunt, Son of Edward III, Kings of
England, and Queen Philippa (.: ., 3rd Ed., 1998), 94-33.
Hereinafter cited as RfC.
2. [S970] Mittelalterliche Genealogie im Deutschen Reich bis
zum Ende der Staufer, online http://www.genealogie-mittelalter.de/,
Könige des Königreiches Italien, 958/59. Hereinafter cited as MGDR.
3. [S970] MGDR, online http://www.genealogie-mittelalter.de/,
Könige des Königreiches Italien.
4. [S1345] Anselme de Sainte-Marie (augustin déchaussé),
Histoire généalogique et chronologique de la maison royale de
France, des pairs, grands officiers de la couronne et de la maison
du roy et des anciens barons du royaume. (Reprod. de l'éd. de
Paris : chez Estienne Loyson, 1674: Num. BNF de l'éd. de Paris :
Bibliothèque nationale de France, 1987. 1 microfilmReprod. de l'éd.
de Paris : Compagnie des libraires associez, 1730, 1730), VIII:861.
Hereinafter cited as Pere Anselme's Histoire, 3rd Ed..
5. [S750] "My Theories", Robert B. Stewart (unknown author
address), to unknown recipient (unknown recipient address); unknown
repository, unknown repository address. Hereinafter cited as "My
Theories".
6. [S970] MGDR, online http://www.genealogie-mittelalter.de/,
Könige des Königreiches Italien, 21.9.1026.
Guillaume I "the Great" de Bourgogne Comte de Franche, Burgundy,
Macon (1024-1087) [Pedigree]
Son of Renaud I Count of Burgundy (986-1057) and Adelais (Judith) of
Normandy Princess of Normandy (0990-1037)
Count of Vienna, Lord of Salms.
b. ABT 1024
b. ABT 1040
r. Bourgogue, France
d. 11 Nov 1087
d. 1087
Married first Stephanie de LONGWY (1035-1109)
Children:
1. Etienne I "Tete-Hardi" de BOURGOGNE Count of Burgundy,
Vienne, Macon (-1102) m. Beatrice of Upper Lorraine (-1090)
2. Raymond de Bourgogne Count of Castile (1060-1107) m. Urraca
of Castile and Leon Queen of Leon and Castile (1082-1125)
3. Guy de BOURGOGNE Pope Calixtus II (-1124)
4. Matilda de Bourgogne (1065-1103) m. Eudes I Borel de
Bourgogne Count Bourgogne (1058-1102)
5. Gisele of_Burgundy (1070-1133) m(1) Humbert_II Count
Maurienne, Savoy, Marquis of Italy (1062-1103)
6. Clemence of Burgundy (-1133) m. Godfrey_I of_Brabant "The
Bearded" Count of Brabant (1060-1139)
7. Ermentrude of Burgundy (1060-1105) m. Dietrich I Count of
Bar-le-Duc (1045-1105)
8. Maud de Bourgogne (1062-1103) m. Eudes I Borel de Bourgogne
Count Bourgogne (1058-1102)
Married second Stephanie of BARCELONA (1045-1092)
Children:
1. Gisela (Gille) of Burgundy-Ivrea Countess of Burgundy-Ivrea
(1060-1133) m(1) Humbert II of SAVOY Count of Murienne and Savoy
(1062-1103)
2. Raimond Count of Burgundy And D' AMANS (1065-1107)
Othon Guillaume Count of Bourgogne, Macon, Dijon (958-1026)
[Pedigree]
Son of Adalbert Marquis of Ivrea King of Italy (936-971) and
Gerberga of Macon (0970-986)
King of Lombardy.
b. ABT 958/959, of Lombardy, Italy
r. Lombard, Italy
d. 21 Sep 1026/7
d. 21 Sep 1026, Dijon, France
bur. Dijon, France
Married first Ermentrude de Roucy Countess of Macon (-1005)
Children:
1. Renaud I Count of Burgundy (986-1057) m. Adelais (Judith) of
Normandy Princess of Normandy (0990-1037)
2. Agnes of Burgundy (995-1068) m(1) William III of Poitou (V
of Aquitaine) "le Grand" Count of Poitou Duke of Aquitaine (969-
1030)
3. Matilda of Burgundy (-1005) m(2) Landry III Seigneur de
Maers, Count of Nevers, Auxerre (-1028)
4. Gerberge of Macon (985-1023) m. William II of Provence Count
Provence (983-1018)
5. Agnes Countess of BURGUNDY (0995-1068)
6. Gerberge BURGUNDY (1007-) m(1) William II Count of PROVENCE
(1005-1018)
Married second Blanche (Alix) of Anjou (942-1026)
http://sandrinenouvel.chez-alice.fr/rougemont.html
Concerned with the bishop of Lang LMBO, they drew their origin from
Audon I of Til-Châtel, wire of Garnier count de Troyes attested into
918 by its signature in an act of the duke of Burgundy Richard.
This family, which carried like armorial bearings a key out of
stake, also paid homage to the dukes of Burgundy and held a row
raised among the lords of the duchy and county of Burgundy. Its
members followed one another of wire father until the year 1299
dates to which Isabelle of Rochefort, girl of Left-handed person of
Rochefort lord of Puiset in Beauce, widow of Guy III of Til-Châtel
Gonfalonier of the County of Burgundy, became lady of Til-Châtel. It
remaria with Humbert de Rougemont about 1306 and Maria her Jeanne
daughter whom it had had with Guy III of Til-Châtel with Thiébaud de
Rougemont wire of a first marriage of her new husband. The seigniory
passes then in this family until the end of the 15° century time to
which the last of Rougemont, not having children yielded the
seigniory to Antoine de Baissey resulting from a family of
Montsaugeonnais which immediately paid homage to the bishop of
Langres.




ROUGEMONT (History of)

Rare republication of book
? Author: Charles Thuriet
? Editions: 1990, reprinting of the work published in 1877
? Format: 14 X 20. 112 pages.
? Price: 18 ?
Work in stock.
Forwarding under 3 working days.





Résumé/description:

Formed around the antique feudal castle of XIe century, demolished
in 1809, Rougemont was, by the authority of its Viscounts, in the
heart of the history of the medieval Franche-Comté. The "knighthood
of Saint-George", created in XIVe century, which brought together
the gentlemen of the area, brought to him famous and prestige.
Charles Thuriet invites us to rediscover the events, and the
characters who marked the past of the borough.
We learn how the city acquired the statute of commune in 1370,
thanks to the charter from stamping from Humbert II from Rougemont.
Plundered, burned by the Swiss army between 1476 and 1480, it was
attached to the crown at the time of the conquest of the Franche-
Comté by Louis XIV, at the end of the XVIIe century. We revisit the
impressed places of memories, the such convent of Cordeliers founded
in the medium of XVe century. Lastly, the author devotes a
significant chapter to the description of the region during the
Revolution: he recalls the prohibition of the meetings, the escape
of the Boilley abbot during Terror, and revives the protagonists of
this disturbed period: Quirot, Bassant, Lambert, Middle-class man,
all inhabitants of Rougemont.
Charles Thuriet carried out the long ones and rigorous research to
deliver a concise, but rich study to us of invaluable information on
the past of the city.
An enthralling reference work for all the amateurs of local history.

Micberth copyright

http://www.notrefamille.com/1800672/livre-histoire/rougemont-
(histoire-de)/

http://perso.wanadoo.fr/andr.leclere/html/dat710.htm







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